Vortex Shedding and Fluidic Flowmeter Applications
(Part 4 of 4)


 

By David W. Spitzer




 

Plastic/Polymer Vortex Shedding and Fluidic Flowmeters
Many vortex shedding and fluidic flowmeters are metal however, many vortex shedding and fluidic flowmeters are constructed of plastics and polymers. These flowmeters are often used to measure the flow of high purity water and other fluids. Many plastic/polymer vortex shedding and fluidic flowmeters are small, but they can be as large as 225 mm (9 inch).

Sanitary Vortex Shedding and Fluidic Flowmeters
Sanitary vortex shedding and fluidic flowmeters are designed and fabricated with materials and finishes that allow application to the food and pharmaceutical industries where they may be cleaned and/or steamed in place.

Two-Wire Vortex Shedding and Fluidic Flowmeters
Many vortex shedding and fluidic flowmeters are designed to require three or more wires to receive power and transmit the measurement signal. Two-wire designs implement both functions over one pair of wires. These designs are usually easier and less expensive to wire and install.

Miscellaneous
Vortex shedding and fluidic flowmeter bodies are designed to withstand outside influences, such as water and corrosive environments. The ability to withstand certain influences is typically expressed as NEMA and/or IP ratings. Installing a flowmeter body that cannot withstand its ambient environment can result in flowmeter body failure.

Vortex shedding and fluidic transmitters that are mounted integral to the flowmeter body are typically pre-wired by the manufacturer. When the flowmeter body is in a suitable environment and accessible for maintenance, this mounting method simplifies installation and is usually more economical.

Some vortex shedding and fluidic flowmeter systems are designed for installation in hazardous locations. Suitability for compliance with European standards (EEx) and the National Electric Code (NEC) are cited. Some vortex shedding and fluidic flowmeters are designed to be intrinsically safe. Intrinsically safe wiring allows the use of less restrictive wiring techniques that can reduce the cost of installation. In addition, testing and servicing of the intrinsically safe wiring can usually be performed while the transmitter is powered.

Excerpted from Excerpted from The Consumer Guide to Vortex Shedding and Fluidic Flowmeters

 

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